How Underground Therapists and Scientists Keep Psychedelic Medicine Alive Despite the Gov’t Ban


How Underground Therapists and Scientists Keep Psychedelic Medicine Alive Despite the Gov’t Ban

It could take decades before these drugs are legal, and the consequences are deadly.

The following is an article written by Tom Shroder based on his new book

Acid Test: LSD, Ecstasy, and the Power to Heal:

In the past decade, after thirty years in the deep freeze, research into the medicinal use of psychedelic drugs, ranging from psilocybin to Ketamine, and from MDMA to LSD, has begun to accelerate. FDA-approved pilot studies and clinical trials using the drugs under controlled conditions and in combination with talk therapy have shown they could be used safely, delivering promising results in a wide range of tough-to-treat maladies, including opiate and tobacco addiction, alcoholism, autism, anxiety, depression and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

These developments are not surprising to some who remember the first wave of research and even widespread clinical use of psychedelics in the quarter century after the accidental discovery LSD in 1943. A global review of psychedelic studies and clinical results in 1963 concluded:  “Some spectacular, and almost unbelievable, results have been achieved by using one dose [of the drugs].”

In 1960, a psychiatrist named Sydney Cohen surveyed the results of 44 physicians who had administered 25,000 doses of LSD or mescaline to 5,000 subjects under widely varying conditions. Cohen found “no instance of serious or prolonged physical side effects” in either those 25,000 sessions or in the wider literature on psychedelic drug studies. Adverse psychological reactions, he found, were rare, and mostly related to pre-existing mental illnesses.

Continue reading »

Advertisements

Financial crisis caused by too many bankers taking cocaine, says former drugs tsar


coke_2535864b

Prof Nutt said that too many bankers who took the drug were “overconfident” and so “took more risks” and said that not only did it lead to the current crisis in this country, but also the 1995 collapse of Barings bank.

He said cocaine was perfect for their “culture of excitement and drive and more and more and more”, adding: “Bankers use cocaine and got us into this terrible mess. It is a ‘more’ drug.”

Prof Nutt is not a stranger to making controversial claims about drugs. His latest attack is on the Government for “absurd” and “insane” laws dealing with magic mushrooms, ecstasy and cannabis, which he said were hindering medical research because regulations meant one of the ingredients – psilocybin, which is used to treat depression – was so hard to get hold of.

He was sacked as the Government’s most senior drugs advisor in 2009 after publishing a paper saying that there was “not much difference” between the harm caused by riding and ecstasy. Society, he argued, did not always “adequately balance” all of the risks inherent in it.

Read full article