Scientists find clues to why everything exists CERN physicists get first hints on what happened to anti-matter Insane Scientists design ‘health and safety’ cow with no horns

Scientists find clues to why everything exists

CERN physicists get first hints on what happened to anti-matter

Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider say they are getting some clues about where all the anti-matter went.

That is a big deal because scientists have long been trying to figure out why anti-matter seemed to disappear.

The answer may lie in the fact that scientists at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, which runs the Large Hadron Collider, say matter and anti-matter may decay differently.

At the beginning of the universe, there was an equal number of particles and anti-particles — matter and anti-matter. These particles had opposite electric charges

It’s believed that when matter and anti-matter collided, they turned back into energy. But if there is still matter in the world, what happened to those matter-busting collisions? Shouldn’t an equal number of both kinds of matter have cancelled each out, leaving nothing behind?

However, everything we see in the universe — from tiny frogs to trees, buildings and stars — are made of matter. And scientists say there is very little anti-matter around.

Something tipped the balance. What process left us with matter but not anti-matter?

Now CERN physicists say they have a lead on what that was: decay.

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Scientists are trying to create a ‘health and safety’ cow by genetically modifying the animals to have no horns, in order to reduce the risk of injuring farmers, walkers and other creatures.

Scientists are trying to create a ‘health and safety’ cow by genetically modifying the animals to have no horns, in order to reduce the risk of injuring farmers, walkers and other creatures.

Preventing horn growth would eliminate the need for many farmers to burn off the horn buds of calves Photo: Getty

Researchers are using gene-editing techniques to insert a DNA patch into the genome of Holsteins, Britain’s foremost dairy breed, to suppress horn growth.

The extra DNA has been taken from other breeds of cattle to create a dairy cow that is identical in every respect to existing livestock but without the horns.

Preventing horn growth would eliminate the need for many farmers to burn off the horn buds of calves in what is a difficult and intensely painful procedure for the animals.

Mansel Raymond, chairman of the National Farmers’ Union Dairy Board for England and Wales, and who keeps 600 Holsteins on his Pembrokeshire farm, said: “The worst thing is the pain for the calf once the anaesthetic wears off.

“So it would be very positive to create hornless cows. It would save a lot of time for us and pain for the calf. Everybody wins.” more

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